HMRN Sailmaker's Warrant Badge.
US NAVY Sailmaker's Rating badge.. 3rd class petty officer (pre 1918)
SAILMAKING
and
SAILMAKERS  II

MOST pictures may
be clicked on to
produce a larger
image!
More sailmaking equipment and ephemera may be found on PAGE ONE
Here are three views of another seam rubber I found for sale on Ebay....  This is a particularly nice example of form and function.  The haft and
handle are very interestingly done of Live Oak ("Lignum Vitae")  
Here we have a Sailmaker's Kit box with tools which I had guessed at about the turn-of-the-20th-century:  my friend, Louis Bartos of Mariner Sails in Alaska
(and a
Master Sailmaker) figures it's nowhere nearly that old, but it IS interesting to see how a kit-box was made up and the contents thereof:   
NOTE: Click on any pic for a larger view and, should you wonder about the tools themselves, the link below some (text) is for a pic which has some clarifying
text embedded in it, but they'll take a bit longer to download if you're on a slow connexion.  
Notable by their absences are sail needles and a sail hook!
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Astonishing!
Sold 20060805 on Ebay
for $766.00!

My jaw will require a
jack to be closed.
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PRESENT KNOTTYERS PAGES                  BELLROPES                             
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FANCYWORK ABOARD VESSELS                 PERSONAL FANCYWORK
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U S NAVY / U S GOASTGUARD FANCYWORK                    KNIVES AND TOOL EMBELLISHMENTS
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There's one item prominently missing from the above kit... A sailmaker's mallet!   This one is a beaut... It may look rough, but it is
essentially in A-1 condition and with a little TLC could be brought right back into operating trim... A new rawhide head covering
and some leather dressing on the handle, add a loop lanyard to the handle and she'll be 'gut fur gehen"  for another century!
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8.5"
3""
-------   Iron core bezel - lanyard hole (1)


------------stacked and cut leather handle over iron spindle (2)





                                       Appx 2.5 lbs.



---------decorative detail (rather graceful for a working tool, eigh?)


----------- rawhide leather covering (to prevent 'denting' wood when cringling) over
     an iron head which is pressed onto the iron spindle core. (3, 4, 5)

                                         Commercially made, probably 1860 - 1880.
(1)                                              (2)













(3)                                                (4)













(5)
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Gleaned from the Museum of Nova Scotia's
webpages, a picture of a traditional
sailmaker's loft:  note the bench, center, and
the "Commander" fids next to it: these were
used for making cringles and earrings in
sails, for rounding out grommets and other
rope-woven items.  The mallet above, or one
of wood, would have been used in the
process.   Note also the sewing machine in
the background:  sailmakers were always
among the first to "grab onto" a new idea for
making the work easier and getting more of it
"out the door".  
At a 2007 meeting of the IGKT in Dieppe, France (at the famous Château de Dieppe), two bags were displayed which caught the
attention of one of the attendees who took some pictures and sent them to me.  I at first attributed them to someone else but they
are really the creation of GABRIEL RICHIR, of France.   Gabriel has also
written a book on knotting and, although it is in French, it is
fairly understandable to anyone conversant with knots.   (We don' need's us'n's no language!  We speaks KNOTS!)

Display from an exhibition in a factory:    
LARGE SIZE                   smaller SIZE
Display (unnamed):                                       LARGE SIZE                   smaller SIZE
Nicely done flat seaming work                          Shewing the work in progress                               What can you identify here?
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WORK BY LUC PROVEUR
A ditty bag with zig-zag stitching
Details of stitching and lanyard ends                         "Spreader" made of a 8-point star                           Detail of hand-stitching "zig-zag"
(Note star outline on eyelets!)
Assorted goodies and a seachest                                                                                                         
becket                                                                                                                                              Ditty bag with two lanyard sets and grips.



                                                                                   Ditty bag with lanyard
Seachest end with becket
(handle) and cleat
Jerry Armstrong of Fairless Hills, PA is a retired Navy Corpsman (HM) and a
machinist/metalsmith.  He read the information on the first page and decided to
have a go at creating a scorpion hook and then dropped them off to me (blush)
several  ( like a
LOT)  of months ago!   Ooops!

Well, here they are at last.   The hook is VERY large  and very HEAVY but the
design is impeccable!  The bail is smooth in rotation, as is the hook, and I defy
anyone to pull that baby out of the axle! (A)

(B) is an attempt at a sail needle.  Again, far too big and heavy for that, but it
makes a wonderful small-work fid and that's what I use it for.  Serendipity!

(C) is a line puller used for getting into the turns of whatever fancywork you have
and pulling the next pass thru.  The eye is well made and the whole is quite
strong!

Nicely done on all points!